Christian Living

More on Scarcity

I’ve been thinking more about scarcity this week. We ended up recording our podcast episodes on the topic in the midst of having our car’s engine die, needing to bake our MacBook (for the nth time), and finishing my first complete draft of book one in my fantasy series (and not having money for an editor). It’s been a stretch. Today is a “preach to my soul” sort of post.

It’s so easy to point to money or time as the problem. If I just had more money, I’d buy a better car or replace the engine without stressing. If I just had more time, I could get more done. If I just had more _____. What goes in your blank?

But circumstances aren’t the problem. The more I grow, the more I agree with Jon Gabriel who said, “There’s such a strong cause and effect relationship between what’s going on in the inside and how my outside is manifesting that that’s the only direction I look.” Our beliefs determine how we respond to circumstances and, over time, those choices determine the shape of our lives.

So what does it look like as a Christian to get rid of scarcity?

I think we have to start with who God is. Without that foundation, there’s no room for anything but scarcity. If I’m responsible for providing for myself, it’s scary when we don’t have money to buy necessities. If I’m responsible for providing for myself, it’s scary when there’s not enough time or money for whatever I’m worried about.

But when we start with God and His care for His children, we live in an abundant world. A world where God creates enough resources for us–whether that’s flat-out miraculous creation (just ask missionaries about that one) or provision through a job or provision through some other unexpected means.

After all, the essence of scarcity has to do with the future, with projecting the amount you have and the amount you need and getting trapped in the distance between those two.

I wonder how the disciples felt in Matthew 14:16 when there’s five thousand people and they tell Jesus to let the people go find food and Jesus tells them to feed the people. Did they freak out? Did their hearts race as they compared the amount of money they could pool together and the number of people? Not to mention the distance between them and any food. Or did they dismiss Jesus’ instructions as some kind of mystical teaching moment (a la martial arts masters: “A whole wave knocks you down, the spray just gets you wet.”)? Or maybe they realized Jesus was setting up for a miracle.

Even when they brought the five loaves and two fish, it wasn’t nearly enough. In fact, the gap between what they needed and what they had to meet that need was enormous.

But that’s the God we serve–He’s all about growing us, increasing our faith, making us into the people He’s designed us to be. He’s also the God who created the universe out of nothing. Proverbs talks about how God allows the wicked to collect money to give it to the righteous. In Psalms, there are verses about God’s abundant provision. He’s the owner of everything that exists. So when we look at our need, we need to look at what God has instead of what we have. And from that perspective, why would there ever be any need to go into scarcity? It’s as silly as a child whose loving, engaged parents are billionaires worrying about money.

Copy of blog_ Taking the easy road

Christian Living

Ditching the Scarcity Mindset

Wow! I can’t believe it’s been weeks since I’ve posted. I’m afraid much of January has been a blur due to a loss in our extended family and posting our New Year’s class for Epic Every Day. I’m sorry I didn’t give you guys a heads up.

Anyway! January is over 🙂 So let’s talk about the rest of the year. I’m reading Brene Brown’s book, Daring Greatly, right now. Love it!! So worth reading if you haven’t read it! In chapter one she talks about scarcity and how we tell ourselves there’s not enough __ from the moment we wake up in the morning (“I didn’t get enough sleep last night.” “I don’t have time to do x.” “I’m so behind!” “I’m too tired to x.”) until we go to bed at night. Even just now I was reading the news and thinking about how many wars the USA is involved in. It’s easy to get caught in “there’s not enough safety.”

I often get caught in the trap of thinking that if I just had more time or just reorganized my schedule the right way–in other words, if my circumstances changed, I would have enough. I wouldn’t be in scarcity because there would be enough time, energy, money, etc., etc.

However, Brown argues the answer isn’t based in circumstances. (If you’ve been reading my blog for any length of time or listened to our podcast, you know this is one of my favorite realities.) Circumstance solutions don’t fix heart problems. If we’re stuck in scarcity mode, we’ll never have enough money to feel secure. Instead, we need a heart change. “Wholeheartedness” is her term (deeply explored in her book, The Gifts of Imperfection) for being enough–being able to be vulnerable and believing in your worth, “facing uncertainty, exposure, and emotional risks, and knowing that I am enough” (Daring, 29).

I love that idea! Being is something that no one can ever take away. You can lose your job but if you are the asset, you can find/create another job. You can lose relationships but if you’re the asset, you can create other relationships. No matter the circumstances, you have the ability to bounce back because of who you ARE.

Working on scarcity is one of my goals for this year so I’ve been trying to reframe my thoughts. Instead of telling myself I’m behind, I tell myself that I’m starting from where I’m at. Instead of waking up and thinking how tired I am and how little sleep I got, I thank God for the amount of sleep I did get and remind myself that I have the opportunity for sleep in 15 hours or whatever it is 🙂

We all have a choice about every day. We can start out with the glass half-empty and spend the whole day lamenting our circumstances. Or we can revel in our being-ness–that we get to be God’s trust fund children, that we have a heavenly Father who loves us and take care of us, that we are fearfully and wonderfully made, that we are who we are. Being who God’s designed us to be instead of living in scarcity gives us room to thrive.

Copy of Blog_ Climbing Last Year's Mountain