Christian Living

Taking the Easy Road

This past week on our podcast we’ve been talking about simplicity. I think this is the time of year when we lose our New Year’s goals–they fall to the wayside, or we get discouraged by how little we’ve accomplished in the past month, or they’re still hanging out in front of us, something to aim for when we get time (if we get time). Although there are many reasons for this loss, I think overcomplicating can be one of them. Sometimes, when we set our goals, we make them more difficult than they need to be.

One of the things I’m trying to do regularly is to ask this question Tim Ferris recommends: “what if this were easy?”

This is a great question because it changes my perspective right away. What if it were easy to design our website? Or to get healthy? Or to eat dinner every day? Or to (you fill in the blank)?

My first thought is to get someone else to do it šŸ˜‰ Today I was making hot chocolate for lunch (50% eggs so it totally counts!), and I asked myself what it would look like if it were easy. A cook came to mind. Ā The same thing happened with our website–my first thought was to get someone else to do it. And that’s not a bad idea.

Rory Vaden talks about how if we’re going to multiply time (do the things today that get us more time tomorrow), we have to start by asking whether it’s something that needs done at all. If the answer is yes, we should ask if someone else could do it. If so, delegate! If you can’t delegate for whatever reason, getting expert help is a great next step. Maybe read a book or take a class. The difference between having a paid wordpress theme and a free one has been night and day–for the first time, I can call the makers and get help if I’m stuck or if the theme isn’t working properly.

Not having to do the work or having someone handhold me through the process are both easy ways to do something–especially in contrast to bumbling my way through something I’m not familiar with.

Asking what it would look like if something were easy can jump us to the end result. It’s kind of like jumping to the end of a maze and working your way back to the beginning–sometimes it’s easier that way. With our podcast website, we talked about what would be easy for us (not having to program or customize!), and then found a theme that was drag and drop. I could wax rhapsodic over how easy it is compared to what I was doing before!

Anyway, sometimes we get stuck because we don’t know what easy looks like or we don’t believe easy is possible. Imagining an easy end result shifts that mindset and gives us the clarity and focus to figure out how to get from here to there. It’s a beautiful thing!

What if what you’re working on today were easy? What would that look like?

blog_ Taking the easy road

Christian Living

Taking Breaks Isn’t For Wusses

I love when something happens that highlights how far I’ve come. It doesn’t happen super often, but every once in a while, I’ll realize what a 180 I’ve done. Every time I watch the Descendants movies, it reminds me how hard it is to move from one world into another.

Growing up, I learned that taking breaks is for wusses. Successful people push themselves until they’re running on empty, and if you can’t handle the heat, then get out of the kitchen. Think that’s enough metaphors? But seriously, until I got sick seven and a half years ago, I lived that. And it meant I had loads of shame once I got sick and couldn’t be a “contributing member of society.” To me, contributing meant giving 110% to every task in front of me.

This week we did a podcast on how taking breaksĀ isn’tĀ for wusses. Taking breaks is a tangible way to surrender to God. He’s the one who proscribed weekly Sabbaths and daily sleeping enough (Ps. 127:2) and yearly festivals. It’s not easy to stop doing–it forces us to trust instead, to believe that God can pick up the slack in our families, our jobs, our goals, etc., etc. I’m far more likely to want to keep at it day and night. As I said on our show, I have to re-surrender about every 20 minutes on my Sabbath because I keep thinking of things that need done.

Taking breaks gives us mental and emotional room to be more effective the rest of the time. For example, sleep-deprivation acts like alcohol–it slows our reflexes, lowers our critical thinking, and impairs judgment. As a society, we often tout our lack of sleep as some kind of badge of honor, but all we’re really saying is that we’re careless with our lives. We’re trading staying up late for being effective and efficient for the next day.

We’re also giving up change in our lives for the pleasure of having a wall-to-wall schedule. I think that fact more than any other has prompted me to prioritize margin in my schedule. It’s like with plants–if you don’t give them enough room to grow, they don’t thrive. We need room in our schedules in order to thrive. Without it, we’ll be miserable and we’ll stay the same miserable people as long as our schedule continues. Without room to process what we’ve learned, to learn new things, to have conversations and relationships, to sit with Jesus, to read, and to think, we can’t grow. One of my worst fears is that I will be the same person 20 years from now as I am today. I can’t imagine carrying the same amount of baggage for decades. It makes me tired just thinking about it!

So! Challenge: Surrendering your time takes actually doing something. It’s not a faith without works deal. For me, surrendering my time means kneeling in the morning and praying over my schedule, taking a Sabbath, and I’m working on going to bed on time. If you already do all those, way to go! If not, pick one and start adding it to your schedule. If you’d like a little public accountability, write which one you’re going to do in a comment.

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